The gentlemen`s agreement of 1907 (1907) was an informal agreement between the United States of America and the Japanese Empire, according to which the United States would not impose restrictions on Japanese immigration and Japan would no longer allow emigration to the United States. The aim was to ease tensions between the two Pacific nations. The agreement was never ratified by the U.S. Congress and replaced by the Immigration Act of 1924. According to the Japan Times, this informal deal had its roots in the mid-70s, when Japan began to have a real problem with groups collectively called Bosozoku – motorcycle street gangs and cars that ignored traffic rules and sowed chaos. Doug DeMuro of Jalopnik is proud to own a Nissan R-32 GT-R, a car produced at the beginning of a gentlemen`s agreement between all Japanese automakers. This agreement consisted of limiting all ps of production cars to less than 300, as it was believed that this made driving safer. Since 1989, all Japanese car manufacturers have approved – at least on paper – a kind of gentlemen`s agreement that limited their advertised ps to 276 hp for vehicles produced on the national territory. Their primary goal was to avoid a PS war in a country where the top speed is 62 mph. But in October, Honda officially broke the agreement on its Legend (Acura RL in the United States) by presenting the 3.5-liter V-6 of the model, strong of 300 hp. Nissan`s RB26DETT has also seen increasingly high torque values over the years (around 260 to 290 lb/ft), although it has shown the same power. At the end of the 90s, it seems quite useless for the agreement to continue, because it was obviously broken by almost everyone. Curiously, the car that eventually broke makes it much less powerful than some of the cars that were produced below As you may or may not know, in 1989, Japanese automakers entered into a gentlemen`s agreement to limit the power of their cars to 276 hp (280 hp).

on paper. As a result, every car produced in Japan from 1989 to the break of the agreement in 2004-2005 was valued at 276 hp, but it is known that many of them actually produced more than that. However, Japanese engine designers will gladly admit that the country`s manufacturers have built cars with more than 276 horsepower. It`s just that none of the automakers officially wanted to violate the agreement. It`s no secret that Mitsubishi Lancer Evos, Subaru Impreza WRX and Nissan 300ZX Twin Turbos have been violating the agreement for years, but in Japan at least they have all claimed to have 276 hp. Fake advertising was ignored for reasons of harmony. Not anymore. A year later, concessions were agreed in a six-point note. . . .