The agreement covers issues such as money, civil rights, border regulation and dispute settlement. It also includes a transition period and an overview of the future relationship between the UK and the EU. It was published on 14 November 2018 and was the result of the Brexit negotiations. The agreement was approved by the heads of state and government of the remaining 27 EU countries[9] and the British government of Prime Minister Theresa May, but met with resistance in the British Parliament, whose approval was required for ratification. The consent of the European Parliament would also have been required. On 15 January 2019, the House of Commons rejected the Withdrawal Agreement by 432 votes to 202. [10] The House of Commons again rejected the agreement on March 12, 2019 by 391 votes to 242[11] and rejected it a third time on March 29, 2019 by 344 votes to 286. On the 22nd. In October 2019, the revised withdrawal agreement negotiated by Boris Johnson`s government was published as a first step in Parliament, but Johnson suspended the legislative process when the accelerated approval programme failed to find the necessary support and announced his intention to call a general election. [12] On 23 January 2020, Parliament ratified the agreement by adopting the Withdrawal Agreement. On 29 January 2020, the European Parliament approved the Withdrawal Agreement.

It was then finalised by the Council of the European Union on 30 January 2020. This triggered Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union, which sets out the procedure for the withdrawal of a Member State from the Union and introduces a two-year countdown to withdrawal. The 599-page withdrawal agreement covers the following key areas:[16] After the blockade of the British Parliament, Prime Minister May resigned and new Conservative Party leader Boris Johnson took over as prime minister. Johnson said he would not use the option available to him in the Withdrawal Agreement to extend this transition period. The prime minister said the 11-month period, which is available without further extension, is “sufficient” to reach agreement on a comprehensive agreement. Following an unprecedented vote on 4 December 2018, MPs decided that the UK government was flouting Parliament for refusing to give Parliament all the legal advice it had received on the impact of its proposed withdrawal conditions. [29] The key point of the opinion concerned the legal effect of the “backstop” agreement for Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland and the rest of the UK with regard to the EU-UK customs border and its impact on the Good Friday Agreement, which had led to an end to the unrest in Northern Ireland – and in particular whether the UK would be safe, to be able to leave the EU in a practical sense according to the draft proposals. On Friday, EU leaders signed the document in Brussels before it was transported by train to London. .